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Christopher Clough-Hunter

Christopher Clough-Hunter

Research Interests

Christopher Clough-Hunter is a third year PhD student and teaching assistant in the Communication Studies Department. This fall, he is currently teaching three discussion sections for The Art of Persuading Others. The past two years, Christopher has taught introductory reading, writing and speaking courses in the Rhetoric department. His current research interests are focused on the rhetorics of disability.  

In particular, Christopher is interested in how disabled individuals make sense or attribute meaning to their disabilities by relating their experiences to others. He is currently working on two essays, one examining Ido Kedar’s poetic prose, in Ido in Autismland: Climbing Out of Autisms Silent Prison (2012), where autistic experience is understood as an impossible “form of being.” The other essay looks at the potential agency in photographing the disabled body, where activist/para-olympian Amiee Mullins attempts to “transform the mindset” of social stigma by posing for the lens. In addition, Christopher has also written about the theoretical intersection of disability studies and post-secular theory, where blindness can be understood as a precarious gift that transforms the meaning of the impaired body.