Steven Ungar

Steven Ungar
Professor, Director of Graduate Studies (Fall 2019)
Education: 
PhD, Cornell University
Office: 
W225 Alder Journalism Building
Phone: 
319-335-1452
Office Hours: 
T/Th 1:50-3:20 PM
Courses Taught: 

Ungar's fall 2019 course offering is “Left Bank Cinema Revisited.”

Selected Publications: 
  • “The Present Social Situation of the French Novel: “Journey to the End of Night (Louis-Ferdinand Céline) & Man’s Fate (André Malraux).” In Christopher Prendergast, ed. The Princeton History of Modern French Literature(Princeton: Princeton Univ. Press) FORTHCOMING 2015.
  • “Walking with Hegel in Marseilles: Robert Guédiguian and Les Neiges du KilimandjaroFrench Cultural Studies (2014), IN PRESS
  • “Totally, Tenderly, Tragically . . . and in Color: Another Look at JLG’s Le Mépris.” InTom Conley & T. Jefferson Kline, eds., A Companion to Jean-Luc Godard. Boston: Wiley-Blackwell, 2014.
  •  “Scenes in a Library: Alain Resnais &Toute la mémoire du monde (1956).” SubStance 128 (2012).
  • Critical Mass: Social Documentary in France, from the Silent Era to the New Wave (U of Minnesota Press, 2018).

    critical mass

Research Interests: 
20th-21st century French fiction, poetry, & thought; first-person narration; everyday life in word & image; French film of the 1930s; Left-Bank cinema (Resnais, Marker, Varda, & Rouch)

Steven Ungar teaches Cinema, French Studies, and Comparative Literature. His book-length publications include Roland Barthes: The Professor of Desire (1983), Scandal and Aftereffect: Blanchot and France Since 1930 (1995), Popular Front Paris and the Poetics of Culture (2005, with Dudley Andrew), and Cléo de 5 à 7 (2008). He has written essays on Jean-Paul Sartre, Francis Ponge, Jean Rouch, Jean Vigo, Patrick Modiano, W.G. Sebald, René Vautier, André Bazin, and Jean-Luc Godard. Ungar completed research on Critical Mass: Social Documentary in France (forthcoming 2018) with support from a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. Recent publications include a chapter on Céline and Malraux in A History of Modern French Literature (Princeton UP). Forthcoming publications include chapter-length studies on Chantal Akerman’s La Captive and on Louis Malle’s Lacombe Lucien. Ungar’s current research is devoted to early documentary and short subject filmmaking in early postwar France.

Cluster: 
Film Studies