Hall of Fame

  • 2012

    Dean Mills

    Hall of Fame

    DEAN MILLS (1965 B.A.), Professor and Dean, Missouri School of Journalism. Dean Mills received a bachelor’s degree in Russian and journalism from the UI, a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Michigan, and a doctorate in communications from the University of Illinois. In his 24-year tenure as Missouri School of Journalism dean, the school has added eight endowed chairs, built two new buildings, and renovated two others-all funded almost entirely by private funds.

    Before entering academia, Mills worked as a professional journalist for the Baltimore Sun, which included time as the Moscow Bureau Chief, and as a correspondent in Washington, D.C., where he covered the Watergate scandal, the resignation of Vice President Spiro T. Agnew, and the Roe vs. Wade Supreme Court decision. Dean and his wife, Sue Cornick Mills (B.A. 1965), have given generously to the UI over the years, creating both the Helene Scriabine Undergraduate Prize in Russian Studies and the John and Shirley Harrison Prize in Journalism. They have two children, Jason and Jesse (2001, M.D.)

  • 2012

    Alan Waxenberg

    Hall of Fame

    ALAN WAXENBERG, (1956 B.A.), Retired Executive Vice President and Publisher, Good Housekeeping. A native of Davenport, Iowa, Alan has long been a loyal and ardent supporter of The University of Iowa. He is a life member of the UI Alumni Association; he has assisted with and sponsored university events in New York; and he has served as a member of the Career Information Network. He is a member of the UI Foundation’s Presidents Club and served on the national campaign committee for the Iowa Endowment 2000 campaign. Alan’s UI philanthropy includes establishing the Alan Waxenberg Scholarship Fund in Journalism. He also chaired the UI School of Journalism and Mass Communication campaign that was responsible for raising more than $6 million that contributed to the building of the Philip D. Adler Journalism Building in 2005.

    Alan’s career in publishing includes stints with Look magazine, Peterson Publishing Company, and Hearst Publishing Company. In 1992, the UI honored him with the Distinguished Alumni Award, the highest honorary accolade awarded by the UI Alumni Association. He resides in Scarsdale, New York, with his wife, Suzanne. They are the proud grandparents of three beautiful granddaughters.

  • 2011

    David Dierks

    Hall of Fame

    Dierks, Vice President, University of Iowa Foundation. David Dierks has been serving the University of Iowa community—service that includes work with six presidents and four interim presidents for the UI—since joining the University of Iowa Foundation (UIF) in 1973. David established, and then managed, the UIF’s Planned and Major Gifts Program in 1973 before taking over responsibility for the direction and administration of all major gift activity in 1999. Among David’s notable contributions to the UI community in his work with principal donors was raising more than $6 million to build the Philip D. Adler School of Journalism and Mass Communication Building. In addition to his direct work with the UI, David has made numerous contributions to the larger community through his service as a member on several boards, an honor society advisor, a speaker, and a contributing writer for several publications.

  • 2011

    Joseph Ascroft

    Hall of Fame

    Ascroft, Professor Emeritus at the University of Iowa School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Born in Malawi, raised in Zimbabwe, and educated in Cape Town, South Africa, Professor Ascroft went on to work in Zimbabwe and Kenya before joining the University of Iowa School of Journalism in 1970. As a teacher, he focused his work on the Foundations of Communications and Third World Development courses. Professor Ascroft’s work frequently took him beyond campus—to Nairobi, Ghana, and Nepal, notably—by way of a Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship and work with the United Nations on various projects. In partnership with the Department of Geography and Political Science, he led the 1982 creation of an interdisciplinary master’s subprogram in Development Support Communication in the School of Journalism (since relocated to International Programs). In addition to his global work as a teacher and social worker, Professor Ascroft has worked as author and contributor on numerous publications.

  • 2010

    Phyllis Fleming

    Hall of Fame

    phyllisfleming

    Fleming received her bachelor's degree in journalism from UI in 1956 and worked at The Daily Iowan as a student. She worked as a reporter and editor for The Gazette for 45 years, retiring in 2002 as deputy managing editor, and served as a member of the Daily Iowan Advisory Board for 20 years. (Deceased)

  • 2010

    Theodore (Ted) Glasser

    Hall of Fame

    tedglasser

    Glasser received his PhD in mass communication from the UI in 1979 and joined the Stanford faculty in 1990, having previously taught at the University of Minnesota and the University of Hartford.  Glasser also held visiting faculty appointments in Finland, Singapore, and as a senior Fulbright scholar in Israel.  In 2002-2003 he served as president of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.  Among his several books, two won the Frank Luther Mott-Kappa Tau Alpha Award, including Custodians of Conscience: Investigative Journalism and Public Virtue, written with James Ettema, which also won the Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi Award for best research on journalism.

  • 2009

    Neil Brown

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1981); Executive Editor and Vice President, St. Petersburg Times. Brown served nine years as the Times' managing editor. He was named to the board of directors of the newspaper's parent, Times Publishing Co., in 1997. Under Brown's leadership, the St. Petersburg Times has become the largest newspaper in Florida and been recognized among the nation's best written and designed papers. In 2009, the Times was awarded two Pulitzer Prizes—for feature writing, and for national reporting for its innovative fact-checking website, PolitiFact.

  • 2008

    Arthur Asa Berger

    Hall of Fame

    MA (1956); Professor Emeritus of Broadcast and Electronic Communication Arts at San Francisco State University, where he taught from 1965 to 2003. Berger has published more than 60 books on the mass media, popular culture, humor, tourism and everyday life. Among his books are Media Analysis Technique, Media & Society Seeing is Believing: An Introduction to Visual Communication, Ads, Fads And Consumer Culture, Media and Communication Research Methods, the Art of Comedy Writing, Shop 'Til You Drop: Consumer Behavior and American Culture, and Vietnam Tourism

  • 2007

    Dorothy K. Ray

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1944); MA (1945); starting in 1952, for more than fifty years, The Dottie Ray Show was broadcast from Ms. Ray's home every weekday morning. While a student, she was editor-in-chief at The Daily Iowan and worked at WSUI. She also served as editor for the Alumni News Bulletin and was the on-Air WSUI news editor. After receiving her master's degree, Ms. Ray taught courses in reporting and editing at the School.

  • 2006

    Roger Thurow

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1979); a long-time Wall Street Journal foreign correspondent, Thurow writes about humanitarian and social development issues. During three decades with the Journal, he has reported from more than sixty countries. Thurow was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize in International Reporting.

  • 2005

    Kenneth Starck

    Hall of Fame

    Ken Starck shares a thirty-year history with the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Starck was director of the School twice—from 1975-86 and from 1990-96. Before coming to Iowa, Starck taught at the University of South Carolina, Southern Illinois University, and the University of Missouri. He is a former Fulbright professor at the University of Bucharest and the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in Beijing. A former reporter at the Commercial Appeal in Memphis, Starck is the author of The Dragon's Pupils: A Chinese Odyssey (1991); Public Relations and Community: A Reconstructed Theory (with Dean Kruckeberg, 1988); co-editor of Perspectives in American Studies: A Reader by American Scholars in China (with W. Patrick Strauss and David Yawkey, 1988), and co-editor of Backtalk: Press Councils in America (with William L. Rivers, William B. Blankenburg, and Earl Reeves, 1972). He retired from the School in 2004, and until 2009 was professor and dean of the College of Communication and Media Studies at Zayed University in the United Arab Emirates.

  • 2004

    John Calhoun Merrill

    Hall of Fame

    John Calhoun Merrill, emeritus professor of journalism at the University of Missouri at Columbia, received his doctorate from the UI School of Journalism and Mass Communication in 1961. He is an internationally renowned scholar in the field of media ethics and the philosophy of journalism. He has taught for more than fifty years at institutions around the world, has been a senior fellow at the Freedom Forum Media Studies Center in New York, and has received the Distinguished Service Award in International Communication from the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, among many other honors. He began his career as a newspaper reporter in the 1930 and continues writing today as a columnist for the Columbia Missourian.

  • 2003

    J. Alan Cramer

    Hall of Fame

    J. Alan Cramer, a 1955 School of Journalism graduate, became a newspaper owner and publisher at age 24, when he took over the Wayne Herald (NE) following his father's death in a plane crash. That began a 47-year journalism career during which Cramer was co-publisher and majority owner of 23 newspapers, two radio stations, and a cable TV system in California, Colorado, Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, and Nebraska.

  • 2002

    Joe Bartelme

    Hall of Fame

    B A (1954), MA (1955); ran news operations of UI's radio station, WSUI, as part of the Journalism-Mass Communication Broadcast News Workshop; won national acclaim from the Radio-Television News Directors Association and Foundation, the George Foster Peabody and Colombia University DuPont Awards; served as vice-president of NBC Network News. (Deceased)

  • 2001

    Hanno Hardt

    Hall of Fame

    Taught at the UI from 1968-2002; became the Fulbright senior lecturer in Yugoslavia (1986-1987); served as professor in communication in the faculty of social sciences in University of Ljubljana, Slovenia since 1991; authored and co-authored several books, including Critical Communication Studies: Communication, History and Theory in America, Idea of Mass Communication, Interactions: Criticaol Studies in Communication, Media & Journalism, and, with UI PhD alum Bonnie Brennen, Newsworkers: Toward a History of the Rank and File and Picturing the Past: Media, History and Photography. Website:http://skylined.org/hardt/ (Deceased)

  • 2000

    James Harris

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1969); founded Iowa City's Prairie Lights bookstore, one of the top independent bookstores in the U.S. that regularly schedules readings featuring well-known authors that are broadcast on public radio stations.

  • 1999

    William Hageboeck

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1928); served as advertising manager, general manager, and publisher for the Iowa City Press-Citizen; served as director of the Iowa City Chamber of Commerce; received the Outstanding Citizen Award from the Iowa City Rotary Club (1963) and UI Distinguished Alumni Award for Service (1992); served as member of UI's School of Journalism Professional Advisory Board. (Deceased)

  • 1998

    Diane Ying

    Hall of Fame

    MA (1968); served as editor-in-chief of the Commonwealth Monthly, Taiwan's first successful business monthly, which she launched; former advisor to Taiwanese President Lee Tenghui; received Meggassaisai Award and the UI Distinguished Alumni Award for Achievement (1996).

  • 1997

    Brian Ross

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1971); received Peabody Award (1974), the Columbia Award (three times), the Sigma Delta Chi Award, the Robert F. Kennedy Award (1979), the National Emmy Award (twice), Overseas Press Club of America Award, award for best TV spot news reporting from abroad, and the George W. Polk National Television Reporting Award. Brian became ABC News' chief investigative correspondent in 1994 after an 18 years at NBC.

  • 1996

    Carol McKay

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1971); served as photo editor at U.S. News & World Report, director of photography at the Kansas City Star, and photo editor of the Louisville Courier-Journal, Milwaukee Journal, and Milwaukee Sentinel; worked in the Milwaukee Bureau of United Press International.

  • 1995

    John Camp

    Hall of Fame

    MA (1971), BA (1966); won a Pulitzer Prize for feature writing (1986) and was a finalist for the same category in 1980; published a novel titled Rules of Prey (1988) and 11 additional "Prey" novels subsequently under the pen name of John Sandford.

  • 1994

    John McCormally

    Hall of Fame

    Served as editor and publisher of the Burlington Hawk Eye; shared a Pulitzer Prize for public service with his staff when he was editor of the Hutchinson (Kansas) News (1965); won William Allen White Award for writing (1979), distinguished Service Award from the Iowa Newspaper Association (1986), and two Iowa Newspaper Association Newspaper of the Year Awards; regular panelist on the Iowa Public Television program Iowa Press; founded the Iowa Freedom of Information Council.

  • 1993

    John Cochran

    Hall of Fame

    MA (1967); served as chief Capitol Hill correspondent for ABC News, chief NBC White House correspondent (1988-1993) and chief European correspondent and chief diplomatic correspondent for NBC News; reported as a freelancer from Southeast Asia during the height of the Vietnam War.

  • 1992

    Frank Luther Mott

    Hall of Fame

    Editor of Journalism Quarterly (1930-1935); served as director of UI's School of Journalism and Mass Communication (called State Univ. of Iowa at the time, 1927-1942); was Dean of the School of Journalism at the U. of Missouri (1942-1951); won a Pulitzer Prize in American History for his four-volume A History of American Magazines (1939). Deceased.

  • 1991

    Mildred Wirt Benson

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1925), MA (1927); first woman to receive a master's degree in journalism at UI; wrote more than 120 children's books, many under pseudonyms; using the name Carolyn Keene, she created the Nancy Drew mysteries series; worked at Toledo Blade until her death at age 96 in 2002.

  • 1990

    Frank Eyerly

    Hall of Fame

    Was associated with the Des Moines Register for 42 years (1927-1969) and served as managing editor the last 23 years. (Deceased)

  • 1989

    Donald Padilla

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1947); founded, directed, and was a First Fellow of the Minnesota Newspaper Foundation; founded financial news wire; received over 35 awards including the Minnesota Press Club's Distinguished Service Award, an award from the National Press Photographers Association, and the Paul M. Lund Public Service Award from the Public Relations Society of America; named "Mr. Public Relations of the Twin Cities." (Deceased)

  • 1988

    Wayne A. Danielson

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1952); taught at University of Wisconsin (1957-1959); served as dean of the University of North Carolina's journalism school (1964-1969) and of the University of Texas School of Communication (1969-1979); served as president of the Association for Education in Journalism (1970-1971); known for work in computer applications for newspaper.

  • 1987

    Peter M. Sturtevant

    Hall of Fame

    MA (1967); served as national editor of all CBS bureaus (1974-1981); served in numerous positions at CBS for 18 years; senior producer of CNN's Moneyline (1985), and vice president for business news for CNBC (1990).

  • 1986

    Judy Klemesrud

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1961); won the Page One Award from the Newspaper Guild of New York (1973, 1983) and the J. C. Penney-Missouri Newspaper Award for best feature story (1974); wrote for the New York Times "women's pages" from 1966 to 1985. She got the Times to publish their first major article on the feminist movement in 1970 and devoted about 20 percent of her writing to the movement. She is still a frequently quoted author about writers and movie actors.(Deceased)

  • 1985

    Carole Simpson

    Hall of Fame

    Attended UI in 1964 working toward a master's degree; taught journalism at Northwestern and Tuskegee Institute; first woman newscaster at WSUI; worked for NBC (1974-1978); joined ABC in 1982 where she became an Emmy Award-winning senior correspondent; served as president of the Radio and Television Correspondents Association (1982-1983). (ABC biographical sketch)

  • 1984

    Catherine Covert

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1945); received the annual Howard Blakeslee Award for outstanding reporting to the general public in the field of heart and blood vessel diseases, the Albert and Mary Lasker Award for Distinguished Science Writing (1952), the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication's Outstanding Achievement Award (1953), and the Empire State Award for excellence in medical reporting (1960); first woman professor in the Newhouse School of Journalism at Syracuse University, and first woman to head the AEJMC History Division (1975). Deceased.

  • 1983

    Charles Swanson

    Hall of Fame

    MA (1946), MA (1946), PhD (1948); second PhD graduate at UI, served as director of research in the University of Minnesota's journalism department (1949-1952), vice president and director of research for the Curtis Publishing Company (1954-1964), and vice president of academic affairs at California State at Fresno (1973-1976); taught at New York University (1968); authored The Golden Chain.

  • 1982

    David Manning White

    Hall of Fame

    PhD (1942); published 18 books including Mass Culture: The Popular Arts in America (1957) and, with Ralph Nafziger, Introduction to Mass Communications Research (1958); chaired Bradley University's journalism department (1947-1949) and Boston University's School of Public Communication (1964-1975); taught at Virginia Commonwealth University (1975-1982); developed the "gatekeeper" theory; helped establish Nafziger-White dissertation award.

  • 1981

    Frederick T.C. Yu

    Hall of Fame

    MA (1948), PhD (1951); first non-American student in the nation to earn a PhD in mass communication; taught at the University of Southern California for three years, served as vice dean (1979); taught at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism from 1962 and was named the first CBS professor of international journalism in 1980; author of five books.

  • 1980

    Corena J. SerVaas, MD

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1946); edited the Saturday Evening Post; co-wrote several cookbooks including Saturday Evening Post Fiber & Bran Better Health Cookbook and The High Lysine & Fiber Cookbook; published several newsletters; appointed by President Reagan to the first Presidential Commission on AIDS; founded and chaired the nonprofit Benjamin Franklin Literary & Medical Society (1976).

  • 1979

    Dorothy Moeller

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1925); publisher of Bremer County Independent & Waverly Democrat during World War II; conducted the first national study on the use of the daily newspaper in the classroom (1956), which later became the nation-wide Newspapers in Education program; edited the Iowa Voter, the state league's bulletin. (Deceased)

  • 1978

    Arthur J. Snider

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1938); reported for the Chicago Daily News from 1946-1978; worked at Chicago Sun-Times from 1978-1980; won the Howard Blakeslee Award for excellence in reporting diseases of the heart and blood vessels (1967), the National Headliner Club's annual award for outstanding news story (1948); served as president of the National Association of Science Writers (1953), president of the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing (1966); inducted posthumously into the Chicago Journalism Hall of Fame (1982). Deceased.

  • 1977

    Murray Seeger

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1951), started career at Buffalo Evening News, moved to Cleveland Plain Dealer, becoming City Hall and State House Correspondent. Won Nieman Fellowship in Journalism at Harvard University (1961-62); editorial director KYW-TV and radio, moving to the New York Times, where he covered labor (1964-65). Joined Newsweek Washington Bureau, economics correspondent; took same assignment at the Los Angeles Times (1967). Was LAT Bureau Chief in Moscow and Bonn and European Economic Correspondent in Brussels; won Loeb Award for economic journalism. Joined AFL-CIO as Information Director (1982-87), moved to Singapore as senior editorial consultant at The Straits Times. Joined International Monetary Fund as assistant director, Department of External Relations (1990-94). In retirement, was senior advisor to curator, Nieman Foundation; Washington Representative, Committee to Protect Journalists; and director of Committee on the Future of Journalism. Taught journalism at U. of Michigan, U. of Maryland, American U., and George Washington U. Visiting journalist in Bangladesh, Indonesia, Jordan, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Sri Lanka, and South Africa. Author, Discovering Russia: 200 Years of American Journalism (2005).

  • 1976

    Herb Nipson

    Hall of Fame

    MFA (1948); worked at Ebony for 40 years (1949-1989); hired as an assistant editor and retired as executive editor. (Deceased)

  • 1975

    Philip D. Adler

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1926); served as editor and publisher of the Kewanee Star-Courier for 23 years; founded and directed UI's School of Religion and served as president of its board of trustees; served as national chairman of UI's Arts Center campaign (1964-1966), and president of newspaper syndicate Lee Enterprises (1960-1970); chaired the UI Foundation (1968-1970); received UI's Distinguished Alumni Award for service (1966) and the Hancher-Finkbine Alumni Medallion (1970); the new Adler J-MC Building (2004) is named in his honor. (Deceased)

  • 1974

    Malcolm S. MacLean

    Hall of Fame

    Served as director of UI's School of Journalism (1967-1974); served as president of the International Communication Association; co-developed the Westley-MacLean communication theory model; co-founder of University College at University of Minnesota; became the Gallup Professor of Communication Research at UI (1964). Deceased.

  • 1973

    Paul Engle

    Hall of Fame

    MA (1932); won the Yale Series of Younger Poets prize for Worn Earth, a collection of poems (1932); served as director of the Iowa Writers' Workshop (1941-1966); served on the National Council of Arts (1965-1971); co-nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize (1976); co-founded the UI's International Writing Program (1967) and co-directed it (1967-1977). Deceased.

  • 1972

    Wallace Stegner

    Hall of Fame

    MA (1932), PhD (1935); established the Stanford Writing Program (1946) and served as its director for 26 years; won a National Book Award for The Spectator Bird (1976), five O. Henry Prizes (1942, 1948, 1950, 1955, 1964), and a Pulitzer Prize in fiction for Angle of Repose (1972); taught in the creative writing programs of the University of Wisconsin and Harvard University. Biographical sketch, courtesy Barnes & Noble. (Deceased.)

  • 1971

    James F. Fox

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1940); served as Chase Manhattan Bank's public relations vice president (1957); taught at New York University (1984); served as national president of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) (1975); received PRSA's Golden Anvil Award (1978); one of the 26 charter members of PRSA's "College of Fellows." (Deceased.)

  • 1970

    Joseph W. Shoquist

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1948), MA (1951); served as president of the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (1983); served as editor of the Milwaukee Journal (1967); served as president of the Associated Press Managing Editors (1979); served as dean of the College of Journalism at the University of South Carolina from 1986-1991. (Deceased)

  • 1969

    Paul Conrad

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1950); won five Sigma Delta Chi awards for editorial cartooning; won three Pulitzer Prizes for editorial cartooning (1964, 1971, and 1984) and two Overseas Club awards; was named to the Nixon Enemies List. Biographical sketch, courtesy Library of Congress. (Deceased)

  • 1968

    Joseph Benti

    Hall of Fame

    MA (1962); won two Emmy Awards as a reporter at Los Angeles-based KNXT (KCBS) in 1978 and 1979 for his work as anchor and writer-reporter for a series of reports on the Panama Canal; anchored the CBS Morning News from 1966-1970.

  • 1967

    Peter Hackes

    Hall of Fame

    MA (1949); served as city editor of UI's WSUI radio station; at NBC won an Emmy Award for coverage of the Apollo space flights in 1969 and 1970; won a Peabody award for his work on NBC's Second Sunday program; served as NBC's congressional correspondent. (Deceased)

  • 1966

    Leslie G. Moeller

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1925); served as sixth director of UI's School of Journalism (1947-1967); one of the first two graduates from the UI's School of Journalism; taught at the UI for 26 years; ran the Bureau of Newspaper Service (1946); served as chair of the Association for Education in Journalism's (AEJ) Committee on Professional Freedom and Responsibility, the Committee on Journalism and Language Skills (1975), AEJ's Committee on Standards in Teaching (1953-1956), and as chair of the accreditation committee for the American Council on Education in Journalism; became the UI School of Journalism's first John F. Murray Professor (1972). Deceased.

  • 1965

    Wendell Johnson

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1928), MA (1929), PhD (1931); served as director of UI's Speech Clinic (1943); served as chief administrative officer of the Iowa Program in Speech Pathology (1947); chaired the UI Council on Speech Pathology and Audiology (1951), the forerunner of the department of Speech Pathology and Audiology; edited the Iowa Literary Magazine (1928); became the Louis W. Hill Research Professor (1963). Deceased; memorial website by Nick Johnson.

  • 1964

    Arthur M. Barnes

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1936), MA (1937); faculty member at UI from 1945-1969; served as director of Pennsylvania State University's School of Journalism; co-founded the Iowa Radio News Association. (Deceased)

  • 1963

    Earl F. English

    Hall of Fame

    MA (1937), PhD (1944); served as dean of the University of Missouri's School of Journalism (1951-1970); designed the accreditation system for the American Council on Education for Journalism; founded the University of Missouri's Freedom of Information Center (1958). Deceased.

  • 1962

    Hartzell Spence

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1930); author of the novel One Foot from Heaven, a New York Times bestseller for 54 weeks in 1941 and several other books; managed United Press International's Special Service Division (1935-1941) and wrote for Look, Reader's Digest, and Saturday Evening Post until the mid-1960s. (Deceased)

  • 1961

    Jess Gorkin

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1936); edited the Daily Iowan (1936-1937); served as editor of Parade magazine for forty years; and edited 50 Plus from 1978-1983. (Deceased)

  • 1960

    Harry Boyd

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1929); edited the Daily Iowan in 1928 and the Cedar Rapids Gazette for three decades; had a nationally syndicated column called "My America"; served in the offices of the Iowa Daily Newspaper Association. (Deceased)

  • 1959

    W. Earl Hall

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1918); received UI's first Distinguished Service Award (1963); served as editor of the Mason City Globe-Gazette for 43 years; edited the Daily Iowan (1917). Biographical note, courtesy U. Iowa Libraries. (Deceased)

  • 1958

    Conger Reynolds

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1912); Public Relations Director of Standard Oil; taught journalism at UI, ran its public relations services; started an Army news service in France during World War I; received the Award of the National Association of Public Relations Counsel (1948); served as director of the Office of Private Cooperation in the U.S. Information Agency (1956-1961). Deceased.

  • 1957

    Frank J. Starzel

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1964); general manager of the Associated Press, the world's largest news organization from 1948-1962; Daily Iowan staffer; finished his degree at age 60. (Deceased)

  • 1956

    Kenneth MacDonald

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1926); headed news operations for the Des Moines Register for 50 years (1927-1977), where he maintained a news staff that won 12 Pulitzer Prizes over several decades; Daily Iowan staffer. (Deceased)

  • 1955

    Daniel Starch

    Hall of Fame

    MA (1904), PhD (1906); founded the Starch Continuing Readership Research Program (1932); best known for devising a procedure for measuring the readership of advertisements known as the Starch Recognition Procedure; founded Daniel Starch and Staff (1923); received UI's Centennial Award; published Principles of Advertising (1923). Deceased.

  • 1954

    Richard L. Wilson

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1926); presented the most comprehensive agriculture program coverage of President Roosevelt's "New Deal" federal farm and public welfare programs; won the Pulitzer Prize for national reporting (1954); headed the Washington bureau for the Des Moines Register, Minneapolis Star and Tribune, and Look (1938-1970); received Sigma Delta Chi's annual award for Washington reporting. (Deceased)

  • 1953

    Beatrice Blackmar Gould

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1921); edited the Ladies' Home Journal for 27 years with husband C. Bruce Gould; edited the UI's Daily Iowan; wrote for the Ottumwa Journal, Des Moines Capital, Des Moines Tribune, and the New York Sunday World; wrote several plays with husband Bruce, including The First Gentlemen of Her Time, Man's Estate, and The Terrible Turk. (Deceased)

  • 1952

    Theodore F. Koop

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1928); edited The Daily Iowan; created CBS' Face the Nation; presided over the Radio-Television News Directors Association. Biographical sketch, courtesy UI Libraries. (Deceased)

  • 1952

    C. Bruce Gould

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1922); co-founded humor magazine Frivol (1919); wrote for the New York Post (1924-1931), the Wall Street News, Saturday Evening Post; wrote several plays with wife Beatrice Blackmar Gould, including The First Gentlemen of Her Time, Man's Estate, and The Terrible Turk; co-edited the Ladies' Home Journal for 27 years with his wife. (Deceased)

  • 1951

    Wilbur L. Schramm

    Hall of Fame

    PhD (1932); founded the Iowa Writers' Workshop; served as director of the School of Journalism (1943-1947); designed the first doctoral program in mass communication in America; founded University of Illinois' Institute of Communications Research; founded and served as director of Stanford University's Institute of Communications Research; founded the East-West Communication Institute in Honolulu, Hawaii. Biographical sketch from The Beginnings of Communication Study in America: A Personal Memoir. (Deceased)

  • 1950

    Harvey Ingham

    Hall of Fame

    Co-owner and editor, from 1903 to 1943, of the Des Moines Register; joined he NAACP in Des Moines, Iowa, and fought against the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s. (Deceased)

  • 1949

    Marquis W. Childs

    Hall of Fame

    MA (1925), Honorary Doctorate of Literature (1969); won first-ever Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary (1970); wrote and edited many books, including The Peacemakers, Taint of Innocence, and Witness to Power; consulted for President Franklin D. Roosevelt; presided over the Overseas Writers and Gridiron Club. (Deceased)

  • 1948

    George H. Gallup

    Hall of Fame

    BA (1923), MA (1925), PhD (1928), LLD (1967); founded Gallup Poll in 1935; founded Quill & Scroll Society at the UI in 1926; taught at UI. (Deceased)