Brian Ekdale

Brian Ekdale
Assistant Professor
Phone: 
319-384-3605
Office: 
E324 AJB
Office Hours: 
Tuesday 9-10 am, Wednesday 1-3 pm
PhD 2011, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Brian Ekdale studies new media, international mass communication, and participatory communication. Within these areas, he is particularly interested in the production of media, focusing on the individuals and groups that create content as well as the contextual and structural factors that determine media production practices. For his dissertation, Ekdale examined organizations in Nairobi's slums that train community members in producing fictional, documentary, and news videos about their communities.

Ekdale has professional experience in video production, digital media, and software training. He has directed multiple award-winning documentary videos and worked as an Instructional Technologist for a community college.

Ekdale has taught Introduction to Mass Communication, Field Production and Post-Production, Mass Communication Practices, Legal and Ethical Issues in Digital Communication, and Online Journalism. He is the Globalization area chair and an Executive Council member for the Midwest Popular Culture Association / American Culture Association.

Selected Publications:

Ekdale, B. (2011). Media activism, youth culture and human rights campaigns for the MTV generation. In B. Musa & J. Domatob (Eds.), Communication, Culture, and Human Rights in Africa (pp. 133-152). Lanham, MD: University Press of America.

Thorson, K., Ekdale, B., Borah, P., Namkoong, K., & Shah, C. (2010). YouTube and Proposition 8: A case study in video activism. Information, Communication & Society, 13(3), 325-349.

Ekdale, B., Namkoong, K., Fung, T. K. F., & Perlmutter, D. D. (2010). Why blog? (then and now): Exploring the motivations for blogging by popular American political bloggers. New Media & Society 12(2), 217-234.

Fair, J. E., Tully, M., Ekdale, B., & Asante, R. K. B. (2009). Crafting lifestyles in urban Africa: Young Ghanaians in the world of online friendship. Africa Today, 55(4), 29-49.